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Duck Confit Recipe

Duck Confit Recipe



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Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup coarse kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons white peppercorns
  • 12 whole duck legs (leg and thigh)
  • 6 7-ounce containers rendered duck fat
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil

Recipe Preparation

  • Finely grind first 4 ingredients in spice mill. Trim excess fat from duck legs; place trimmings in bowl, cover, and chill. Rub salt mixture all over duck legs. Layer legs and garlic cloves in large resealable plastic bag. Seal; chill 24 hours.

  • Preheat oven to 325°F. Simmer duck fat, duck trimmings, and 1 cup water in large saucepan over medium-low heat until water evaporates and simmering slows, about 30 minutes. Thoroughly rinse salt mixture from duck and discard garlic; pat dry. Place duck in large deep roasting pan. Pour hot fat over. Cover with foil; place in oven. Cook until meat is tender and falling off bone, about 3 1/2 hours. Uncover; cool slightly. Transfer to refrigerator. Chill until cold. Cover; chill at least 4 hours. DO AHEAD Can be made 1 month ahead. Keep chilled and completely covered in duck fat. Always use clean tongs to remove duck from fat in pan.

  • Before using duck confit in a recipe, preheat oven to 400°F. Heat oil in heavy large skillet over high heat. Remove duck from fat; scrape fat back into pan. Working in batches, cook duck, skin side down, in skillet 1 minute. Transfer, skin side down, to rimmed baking sheet. Roast until skin is crisp and duck is heated, about 15 minutes. Remove from sheet, keeping skin intact.

Recipe by Sandra Bernstein,Reviews Section

Duck Confit recipe Washington Post

I have a friend who loves duck confit and prefers to always make it herself. Last month (April 2021) WP published a recipe so I printed it out and gave it to her. She tried it immediately and said it was the easiest and best method she had ever used. Since WP is subscriber-only, here's the recipe. I hope this okay my 1x posting here.

"You can make sublime duck confit without fancy techniques or expensive fat. Here’s how."
Washington Post by Olga Massov Feb. 23, 2021

Duck Confit
Active time: 15 mins
Total time: 4 hours 5 mins (plus 24 to 72 hours curing time)
Servings: 6 to 8

1 tablespoon kosher salt
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried (may substitute rosemary or sage)
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
8 moulard duck legs (about 4 pounds total, see NOTES)
1 head garlic, halved across the equator (optional)
Strips of zest from 1 orange (optional)

1. In a small bowl, combine the salt, thyme and pepper. Sprinkle half of the seasoning mixture over a large, rimmed baking sheet. Place the duck legs in a single layer on top and sprinkle with the remaining seasoning mixture. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 24 and up to 72 hours.

2. When ready to cook the duck, position a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 250 degrees.

3. In a large, ovenproof skillet or Dutch oven (a 7-quart oval oven works better than an 8-quart round Dutch oven), arrange the legs in a single layer, skin side down, so they fit snugly. Nest the garlic head halves and orange zest among the duck pieces. Cover and transfer the skillet or pot to the oven for 2 hours.

4. Remove the lid, flip the duck over, skin side up, cover with a large piece of aluminum foil, and continue to slow-roast for 1 hour and 30 minutes more, or until completely cooked through and you can wiggle a bone in the leg without any resistance.

5. If serving right away, transfer the legs, skin side up, to a large, rimmed baking sheet and increase the oven temperature to 450 degrees. Return the duck to the oven for about 20 minutes, or until the skin is crispy. (Otherwise, transfer the duck, the cooking liquid and all of the rendered fat to a large container with a lid, let cool to the touch, no more than 1 hour, then cover and refrigerate. When ready to serve, follow reheating directions in the storage field.) Discard the orange zest before serving or storing.

NOTES: Moulard duck legs often vary in size. If yours are larger — closer to 1 pound each, instead of 8 ounces — add about 12 hours of curing time and adjust the seasonings accordingly.


Duck Confit recipe Washington Post

I have a friend who loves duck confit and prefers to always make it herself. Last month (April 2021) WP published a recipe so I printed it out and gave it to her. She tried it immediately and said it was the easiest and best method she had ever used. Since WP is subscriber-only, here's the recipe. I hope this okay my 1x posting here.

"You can make sublime duck confit without fancy techniques or expensive fat. Here’s how."
Washington Post by Olga Massov Feb. 23, 2021

Duck Confit
Active time: 15 mins
Total time: 4 hours 5 mins (plus 24 to 72 hours curing time)
Servings: 6 to 8

1 tablespoon kosher salt
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried (may substitute rosemary or sage)
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
8 moulard duck legs (about 4 pounds total, see NOTES)
1 head garlic, halved across the equator (optional)
Strips of zest from 1 orange (optional)

1. In a small bowl, combine the salt, thyme and pepper. Sprinkle half of the seasoning mixture over a large, rimmed baking sheet. Place the duck legs in a single layer on top and sprinkle with the remaining seasoning mixture. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 24 and up to 72 hours.

2. When ready to cook the duck, position a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 250 degrees.

3. In a large, ovenproof skillet or Dutch oven (a 7-quart oval oven works better than an 8-quart round Dutch oven), arrange the legs in a single layer, skin side down, so they fit snugly. Nest the garlic head halves and orange zest among the duck pieces. Cover and transfer the skillet or pot to the oven for 2 hours.

4. Remove the lid, flip the duck over, skin side up, cover with a large piece of aluminum foil, and continue to slow-roast for 1 hour and 30 minutes more, or until completely cooked through and you can wiggle a bone in the leg without any resistance.

5. If serving right away, transfer the legs, skin side up, to a large, rimmed baking sheet and increase the oven temperature to 450 degrees. Return the duck to the oven for about 20 minutes, or until the skin is crispy. (Otherwise, transfer the duck, the cooking liquid and all of the rendered fat to a large container with a lid, let cool to the touch, no more than 1 hour, then cover and refrigerate. When ready to serve, follow reheating directions in the storage field.) Discard the orange zest before serving or storing.

NOTES: Moulard duck legs often vary in size. If yours are larger — closer to 1 pound each, instead of 8 ounces — add about 12 hours of curing time and adjust the seasonings accordingly.


Duck Confit

Duck Confit is a traditional French dish that consists of very tender and moist duck meat that is slowly cooked in duck fat. It is one of the finest dishes in French cuisine and is absolutely delicious.

The meat is first cured in salt and spices for up to two days and then covered with melted duck fat and slowly cooked in the oven on very low heat until very tender. After cooking the duck confit is preserved, covered in duck fat and refrigerated until ready to serve.

Before serving, the meat is gently removed from the fat and seared in a pan until the skin gets really crispy. The moist and tender meat meets the crispy skin and the combination is really flavorful and totally amazing.

I usually like to serve duck confit with a refreshing salad, but feel free to serve it alongside braised cabbage, roasted potatoes or your favorite side dish. Enjoy!


What Does Confit Mean?

Confit (pronounced con-fee) comes from the French word confire meaning “to preserve.” Confit refers cooking food slowly, usually immersed in fat, in order to preserve it. When confit-ing meat, the meat is generously salted to aid in preservation.

Duck confit is made by curing duck (often a whole duck) in salt and then cooking it slowly in its own rendered fat. The result is very tender meat that is infused with salty, meaty flavor.


How To Make: Duck Confit

As lockdown restrictions ease in the UK, with hospitality businesses such as restaurants, pubs, bars, and cafes now able to reopen for indoor drinking and dining, small dinner parties are also permitted. As of Monday 17 th May, groups of six or two households are able to meet indoors, providing an ideal opportunity to show off those new cooking skills picked up over various states of lockdown. Of all the impressive dinner party dishes, and there are many, duck tends to feature in most of my favourites. Pan-seared duck breast is a good, arguably healthier, use of the bird, but there’s nothing quite like duck confit – considered one of the finest French dishes, and for good reason.

A dish that’s made across France, duck confit (or canard de confit) is a particular specialty of Gascony. According to the families perpetuating the tradition of duck confit, all of the duck’s pieces are used to produce the meal, with each element having its own specific use in traditional cooking. Duck legs are the most popular choice for modern duck confit, however. To produce the dish, a centuries-old process of preservation dates back to a time long before refrigerators were invented. Here, salt and herbs are used to cure the duck, typically for anywhere between 12-36 hours. Once cured, the salt and herbs are washed off before the meat is patted dry then slowly cooked in its own fat. The entire process takes time, but the final result’s flavour is worth every second of cooking, which is mostly inactive. It just requires a bit of planning.

As well as lasting for around one month when cooled and stored, covered in its fat, duck confit is a remarkably versatile dish, and the leftover fat demands to be reserved and used for future cooking. Crispy sautéed potatoes are a perfect accompaniment to duck confit, as is a simple bitter leaf salad. This duck confit recipe makes enough for six people, but can easily be scaled up or down accordingly, served with braised red cabbage and pear.


Related Video

I keep making this because I keep getting rave reviews. I serve as a dinner entree. Scrummy as Mary Berry would say.

Turned out fantastic! Had to substitute coconut milk for cream and Marsala for Madeira, but it still turned out great. Awesome decadent breakfast. rich and filling.

Very good. I made it a few times - last time I dropped the cream/madeira and I prefer it that way - otherwise it's a bit too heavy/cloying. Hash can be made in advance and heated together with duck before serving.

coachdave, I assume that is a typo. As far as shredding the duck, you do not use 'raw' duck in this recipe. You use duck confit.

What does 1 3D4 hr mean? Tried it and just OK. Second Gourmet duck recipe that wasn't worth the effort. How can you possibly cook duck sufficiently for shredding after 8 minutes in a pan at moderate heat? And the rest, while still tasty, just doesn't make for memorable cuisine.

I'm not sure who can eat this for breakfast but I actually served it as a main dinner course. It was absolutely stunning and just as good the next day. The prep takes a long time and you have to be very careful shredding the duck since you are using the full leg and not jut the drumstick, A real winning dish

This was really a wondeful dish, i topped the hash with some lightly dressed baby argula and two poached eggs per person.

Loved this-- used slightly less cream (too much of a good thing, I think) and this was amazing!

I followed this recipe exactly, with the exception of salting and peppering to my taste and just didn't think it was that great. It was too fatty for me, and I didn't feel that it was that incredible. It definitely made a lot of food though. I cut the recipe by 1/3 to make it for two and found the portions huge (and also wondered what type of a pan even exists to fit portions for 6 people!).The hash part itself (carrots, potatoes, onions) was nice in the duck fat with the skin, but I would reserve the meat for something where it can be appreciated on its own, or at least not so heavily obscured. I also may have a prejudice toward chesse with my hash--I've never had it without until now. Either way, it smelled great cooking, and turned out ok, but is not a keeper for me.


Place the duck legs in a shallow baking dish or pan. They should fit in without crowding.

In a small bowl, combine the salt, pepper, thyme, crushed juniper berries, and crumbled bay leaves. Rub the duck legs all over with the mixture.

Cover the dish with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight or up to 24 hours.

When you're ready to cook the duck, heat the oven to 325 F.

Pat the duck legs dry with paper towels. Do not rinse. Place the duck legs, skin-side down, in a large, heavy oven-safe skillet over medium heat. Cook them for about 8 to 10 minutes on each side, until browned and you have plenty of rendered fat. In a 10- or 12-inch iron skillet, you should have about 1/4 inch of fat. Add more duck fat if you need it.

If the skillet is not oven safe or isn't large enough to fit the legs, move the legs and fat to a baking pan just large enough to fit. Cover the skillet or baking pan tightly with foil. Bake for 2 hours.

Remove the foil and continue baking, with the legs still skin- and fat-side up, for 30 minutes. Pour off all but 1 tablespoon of the fat and continue baking, skin-side up, for another 30 minutes. Serve.


You can make sublime duck confit without fancy techniques or expensive fat. Here’s how.

If you are a duck lover — and I am, as evidenced by my Thanksgiving sheet pan menu — duck confit is a dish you probably love to eat but have never made.

A staple at French bistros, usually accompanied by crispy potatoes and a leafy green salad, duck confit at once feels like a simple comfort and a luxurious indulgence. The glistening, crispy skin gives way to succulent meat falling off the bone in a classic French dish that, when prepared the traditional way, can seem daunting to achieve at home.

Originating in Gascony, which is famed for its duck, confit is a centuries-old preserving method, used before the advent of refrigeration. The word “confit” is the French past participle of the verb “to preserve.” While duck confit is famous, you can basically confit anything, so long as you cook it very slowly, over low heat, and store it in ample fat, which creates a hermetic seal.

I’ve shied away from making my own confit, because I believed, erroneously, that you needed lots of rendered duck fat — both expensive and hard to find — to make it. The dish has always felt costly and finicky to achieve.

I couldn’t have been more wrong.

The pandemic quarantine, which is now approaching a year, has inspired me to tackle cooking projects I might not have otherwise, and I’m delighted to report that in this particular case, making duck confit at home is extremely easy. Most of the cooking time is hands-off, so all you have to do is stick around your home, which I’m doing a lot of these days.

As I was missing the taste of confit I’ve enjoyed in restaurants, I got to thinking: I’ve slow-roasted fish, chicken and vegetables in ample olive oil, or other fat I had on hand, to get the same succulent effect. Duck, especially the leg, is fatty and releases plenty of fat during cooking. What if, I thought, I slow-cooked duck legs just as they are? It wouldn’t be traditional confit, but I wouldn’t need vats of rendered fat to store my duck for months on end.

A quick search in my cookbooks and online confirmed making duck confit without extra rendered fat was possible. In the “Blue Ribbon Cookbook” (Clarkson Potter, 2010), written by cookbook author and New York Times food columnist Melissa Clark with Bruce and Eric Bromberg, the Brombergs shared that they make confit with rendered duck fat only because, as restaurant owners, they have economies of scale working in their favor. Home cooks, without a brigade of chefs and myriad multiple preparations, have no such thing. As such, buying rendered duck fat seems like a punishingly costly endeavor — and, as it turns out, completely unnecessary.

Just let the legs provide the needed fat.

The ingredients are laughably simple: Duck legs, salt, pepper. That’s it. The dry seasonings make up the cure, but, if you’re feeling fancy, by all means dress up your duck by adding chopped herbs — fresh or dried. And, when it’s time to cook, you can add additional aromatics, if you desire. Or not.

In testing the recipe, I made batch upon batch, enlisting friends and co-workers to help nail down “the” method. I roasted at different temperatures, pricked the meat with knives and sharp needles to see if it helped with the fat rendering used varying seasonings and aromatics tried different cooking vessels and experimented with pan- vs. oven-crisping methods.

In the end, I settled on a very low temperature, a large, wide oven-safe skillet covered with foil, and simple but fragrant aromatics of garlic and orange peel. Though largely hands-off, you need to plan ahead: Ideally, the duck legs should cure in the refrigerator for at least one day, preferably two, and even up to three. The salt will draw out extra water and, instead, flavor and tenderize the meat.

The roasting takes about 4 hours (most of it hands-off) with the legs fitting snugly next to one another. To get enough fat for best results, it is best to cook quite a few of them — at least eight — at a time. For a family of four, that equals two meals. For a couple, it’s four meals, and if you’re cooking for yourself, it’s eight individual meals, which you have to cook only once!


Watch the video: Carla Makes Surprisingly Easy Duck Confit. From the Test Kitchen. Bon Appetit (August 2022).